Pioneers in Cardiology - Scheinman

Dr Scheinman is a Professor of Medicine at UCSF and the 
Walter H. Shorenstein Endowed Chair in Cardiology where he heads the Cardiac Arrhythmia Genomics Clinic.  Dr Scheinman is one of the key innovators and fathers of cardiac electrophysiology.  

He grew up in Brooklyn, New York and took his undergraduate degree at Johns Hopkins University where he graduated first in his class. His subsequent postgraduate medical education included:
Medical School: Albert Einstein College of Medicine 1960
Residency: North Carolina Memorial Hospital, (Chapel Hill) Internal Medicine 1965
Fellowship: UCSF Medical Center, Cardiovascular Diseases 1967 

He is a master teacher and has garnered various teaching awards at UCSF as well as the Paul Dudley White Award for Excellence in Teaching by the American Heart Association.  Perhaps his greatest contribution revolves around development of catheter ablation techniques.  Dr Scheinman was the first person to have performed catheter ablation in humans using high energy direct current shocks. He was a pioneer in the ablation of accessory pathways and fast AV nodal pathway. He has also worked on various other endeavors including demonstrating the role of EP studies in determining need for pacemakers in patients with AV conduction disturbances, proving the efficacy of intravenous amiodarone therapy for patients with malignant ventricular tachycardia, and in defining the basic mechanisms of unusual forms of atrial flutter. mHe also combined pacemaker and beta-blocker therapy for patients with the long QT syndrome, worked on the use of new antiarrhythmic agents (i.e., Ibutilide, Azimalide) and made contributions in the genetic causes of sudden death.


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